Blog

Walking Away From Medicare

About a year and a half ago, Dr. Leslie Kernisan, 37, a geriatrician in San Francisco, decided she couldn’t stand her medical practice any longer. Every day, she felt she was shortchanging her older patients. “What I had in the way of time and resources to meet patients’ needs was so inadequate that it felt(…)

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Two Web Sites to Visit

Earlier this week, I mentioned two of the more absorbing blogs I’ve come across recently, other corners of the online world where people are talking about aging and caregiving and the final phases of life. Now, let me recommend a couple of helpful Web sites. First: the recently revamped LongTermCare.gov, produced by the Administration for(…)

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Fewer Hospitalizations for C.O.P.D. Patients

Valeri Shanin You don’t see supermarket products emblazoned with ribbons to help support research on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Major corporations don’t sponsor walkathons for thousands of cheering supporters. This group of respiratory disorders, including emphysema and chronic bronchitis, is the third leading cause of death in the United States and accounts for a fifth(…)

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On Becoming an ‘Orphan’

Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times Paula Span with her father, Murray Span, in 2011. I was lucky enough — I do see it that way — to be with my parents when each died. My mother gave us more warning: a couple of strokes, a cancer diagnosis, three months of hospice care, a two-week final(…)

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A Deadline Missed

Legions of home health aides continue to toil for less than minimum wage, the only American workers not covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act. More than a month has passed since May 14, when President Obama could have ended this exclusion and, with the stroke of a pen, forced a new regulation into effect.(…)

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Death Be Not Decaffeinated: Over Cup, Groups Face Taboo

Julie Glassberg for The New York Times Nancy Gershman, left, and Audrey Pellicano, who hosts the New York Death Cafe. The fifth meeting will be held on Wednesday. Socrates did not fear death; he calmly drank the hemlock. Kierkegaard was obsessed with death, which made him a bit gloomy. As for Lorraine Tosiello, a 58-year-old(…)

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A Family Ritual Gains New Life

Even after the second stroke robbed Betty Woodruff, 96, of her sharp mind and memory, she fought to stay mentally active in the ways she had always loved, like participating in her regular bridge game. Rosemary Woodruff Betty Woodruff, 96, who has dementia, reads from a children’s book. Her daughter Rosemary, 64, one of five(…)

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Price Reductions for Diabetes Care Supplies

Starting next month, changes are afoot for Medicare beneficiaries who order diabetes supplies — testing strips and lancets — by mail. About 50 percent to 60 percent of diabetics on Medicare prefer to receive supplies in their mailboxes, a cheaper and often more convenient alternative to local pharmacies and storefronts. Yet mail-order diabetes supplies have(…)

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Medicare to Pay Less for Diabetes Care Supplies

Starting next month, changes are afoot for Medicare beneficiaries who order diabetes supplies — testing strips and lancets — by mail. About 50 percent to 60 percent of diabetics on Medicare prefer to receive supplies in their mailboxes, a cheaper and often more convenient alternative to local pharmacies and storefronts. Yet mail-order diabetes supplies have(…)

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When Hearing Aids Won’t Do

Most older adults choose not to use hearing aids. Many find them too expensive, difficult to manipulate, embarrassing — or just too poignant a reminder of advancing age. But hearing aids aren’t the only options available. In selected situations, a device known as a personal sound amplifying product, or P.S.A.P., can be a useful alternative,(…)

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