Eldercare News

When You Know There’s Something Wrong

“He insisted that things were changing, but he aced all of our tests,” said Rebecca Amariglio, a neuropsychologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. But about seven years later, he began showing symptoms of dementia. Dr. Amariglio now believes he had recognized a cognitive change so subtle “he was the only one who could(…)

Read More

In the Doctor’s Office, a Neglected Resource

John Moore/Getty Images When it comes to providing health care for an aging nation, the bad news is no longer news. We already lack sufficient numbers of gerontologists and other professionals — nurses, social workers, pharmacists, aides — trained in geriatrics, and the shortage is projected to increase. The good news, confirmed by a study(…)

Read More

In Europe, Dementia Rates May Be Falling

We talk about some grim stuff in this space, so when a bit of good news surfaces about aging, we want to celebrate. And this recent report from Denmark does sound promising. Researchers there compared two groups of nonagenarians born 10 years apart and found that not only did those born in 1915 live longer(…)

Read More

When Aggression Follows Dementia

For more than five years, Phyllis Edelstein managed to care for her husband Richard in their Long Island home as his dementia slowly progressed. She felt fortunate to have found, and to be able to pay for, a live-in couple to help her. But last fall, “he was becoming more negative about things like showering,”(…)

Read More

Unable to Cope, Unwilling to Accept Aid

The 72-year-old man hadn’t bathed in more than six months. His hair was long and matted. Instead of using the bathroom, he would urinate in a bucket and throw it out the window. From his standpoint, nothing was wrong: he was living the way he liked. But his neighbors in Houston thought his neglectful habits(…)

Read More

High Disability Rates Persist in Old Age

Weird berries. Capsules of unpronounceable supplements. Yoga or tai chi. Crossword puzzles. Such amulets, we’re told, may ward off disability — which is the real fear that accompanies aging, isn’t it? Not the sheer number of years that will have passed, but the things we’ll no longer be able to do. But our efforts to(…)

Read More

A Child’s Love, Mandated by Law

But Chinese officials apparently think it is not enough these days to count on tales and parental admonitions to teach children the importance of filial piety, arguably the most treasured of traditional virtues in Chinese society. The government enacted a law on Monday aimed at compelling adult children to visit their aging parents. The law,(…)

Read More

A Search for Harmony

Nick Wall Vanessa Redgrave, 75, in the film “Unfinished Song,” which will be released on Friday. Can choral singing really help people age well? Maintain their health and their crucial social connections? Perhaps find their way through grief and loss? That’s a tall order, but the new film “Unfinished Song” quietly makes those claims. Opening(…)

Read More

Learning to Spot Frailty

Doctors should screen all adults over age 70 for frailty, a medical syndrome that affects 5 percent to 10 percent of people in this age group, according to a new consensus statement from six international medical organizations. Frail seniors are tired, weak, thin and listless, with a reduced ability to bounce back from physical challenges(…)

Read More

Two Blogs Worth Reading

This week, let me pass along some of the more absorbing blogs and Web sites I’ve come across recently, other corners of the online world where people are talking about aging and caregiving from very different perspectives. I find a blog called Watching the Lights Go Out particularly compelling. Much of what we read and(…)

Read More